New data reveals arts and culture contributions to California’s bottom line

We’ve been reveling in some arts stats that came out last month: The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Endowment for the Arts released new figures that paint an insightful picture of America’s creative economy. For the first time, the data reveals not just the national impact, but also break down the commercial force of the arts in each of the 50 states.

The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account tracks the yearly economic impact of arts and cultural production from 35 industries, both commercial and nonprofit. It reports on economic measures: value-added to the GDP, employment, and compensation at both the state and federal level.

In 2015-—the most recent data in the ACPSA report—the arts employed 4.9 million workers across the U.S. and contributed $763.6 billion to the national economy. That represents a nearly 40 percent growth in GDP contribution since 1998. In that same time, consumer spending on the performing arts nationwide has nearly doubled.

CAreport

And now for the part you were waiting for—California’s creative industry. It’s good news. It’s very, very good news:

  • The arts added $174.6 billion in value to California’s economy. That’s 7.1 percent of the state’s overall GDP, and comparable to the contributions of the construction, agriculture, and transportation industries combined.*
  • Arts and culture production employed 705,506 people in California paid $80.2 billion in compensation,  making up 4 percent of the state’s employment and 6 percent of the state’s compensation.

We’re sure you’re still wondering, how’d we measure up when compared to other states?

  • 1st among all states in ACPSA value added
  • 7th among all states in ACPSA value-added growth
  • 1st among all states in ACPSA employment
  • 7th among all states in ACPSA employment growth
  • 1st among all states in ACPSA compensation
  • 1st among all states in ACPSA compensation growth

Well done, California. We like this look on you. 😉

The numbers look slightly different than those gathered by the Otis Report on the Creative Economy of California, a report supported by the California Arts Council. Dates and defining of terms and parameters vary from one report to the other. But the story told by the ACPSA numbers is the same, and one we art lovers know by heart: Art means business, and business is booming. And in California, where creativity is at the core of our identity, it’s important that we demonstrate that value—while continuing to grow our economy—by making a conscious investment in our artists.

Want more of the juicy details? Go on and mine that treasure trove of data for yourself. For all national findings, see this arts data profile. For all state findings, see this arts data profile.

*From the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies Data Dashboard.

(Featured photo: Creative California Communities grantee Flyaway Productions.)

 

 

Blog bite: 2018 Poets’ Prize awarded to California’s poet laureate

A cause for celebration: California Poet Laureate Dana Gioia’s 2016 book, 99 Poems: New & Selected, has been chosen as the winner of this year’s Poets’ Prize. The award, administered by Lake Forest College, is presented annually to the best book of verse by an American author published within the two years prior.

99 Poems: New & Selected features 12 new poems juxtaposed with work spanning Gioia’s career, most notably examining life’s more solemn experiences of death, time, mortality, grief, love, and family.

“I’m deeply pleased to have the book recognized by this fine award. It is a pleasure to be prized,” Gioia said in a statement.

Gioia also won a Poets’ Prize in 1992 for his book The Gods of Winter, making him the first recipient in the prize’s 30-year history to be honored on two separate occasions for different works.

He will be recognized at an award ceremony and reception on May 18 in New York.

From all of us here at the CAC, congratulations!

As California’s poet laureate, Gioia’s been on the road as “poetry’s public servant” and making a visit to every county in California. To see pictures from Gioia’s travels and learn more about past and upcoming events, visit http://capoetlaureate.net.

 

 

Support arts education before Tax Day

With each passing day, we inch closer and closer to this year’s tax deadline of April 17. We have reached peak procrastination.

If you’ve yet to file, don’t worry—you’re not alone. Nearly a quarter of Americans wait until the last two weeks to take care of their taxes.

You’re also not too late to do your part for keeping creativity inside California’s classrooms.

The latest data from Create CA shows that while participation in the arts among our students has improved, there’s work left to be done. And those who need the social and academic benefits of arts instruction the most—low-income students, English-language learners—are the ones most likely to go without.

In order for California to take home the A-plus for arts access on its report card, we need equitable access to quality arts education programs for all of our students, statewide. No exceptions.

They say taxes are one of two things that are certain in life. The California Arts Council’s Keep Arts in Schools Fund is one small way to help make creativity in California’s classrooms a sure thing, too.

Between now and April 17, make a donation of $1 or more to the Keep Arts in Schools Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund. 100% of your tax-deductible contribution is applied to arts education programming supported by the California Arts Council.

You’ll be helping grantees like About Productions bring mentoring to Pueblo Continuation High School in East L.A., helping students to create their own scripts based in the history of their community. Or Yolo Arts bring its ceramics program to elementary schools in the rural towns of Woodland and Esparto.  And you’ll help Thingamajigs teach music and innovation to students in Oakland, building instruments from everyday materials while showing students how math, physics, and design are used in their creation. And so many more.

Every dollar counts. Here’s how to donate.

P.S. If you’ve already filed, that’s OK! We’re sure you’ve got some pals who like to put things off. Help us spread the word.